The Japanese Style In Van Gogh Paintings

The Japanese Style In Van Gogh Paintings

A saying implies that we do not value what we have until we lose it. That is the case with Vincent Van Gogh, a Dutch post-impressionist painter who became famous posthumously and one of the most influential figures in Western art.

Despite his lack of money and resources, Van Gogh created hundreds of stunning artworks. He was a post-impressionist painter who lived in poverty. Japanese art influenced his artwork, which he saw during trips to Europe, Japan and China.

He was interested in Japanese woodblock prints and often tried to imitate their style. Japonisme came about because of the craze for art from the Orient in Europe during the late 1800s. Vincent van Gogh became obsessed with Japanese art from an early age. 

Collecting them took up most of his limited financial resources. Van Gogh considered himself a great fan of Hokusai, Utamaro, and Hiroshige. You can see the influence of these artists in many of his works. In this article, we will look in-depth into how Japanese art influenced the work of Vincent Van Gogh.

Van Gogh Loved Japanese Woodblock Prints

Van Gogh was enthused by Japanese woodblock prints and often tried copying their style. He was inspired by the simplicity of Japanese art, which he felt captured the essence of a subject matter more than European art did. 

Van Gogh used simple colors and lines in his paintings to convey this feeling of minimalism. He was also influenced by artists like Hokusai and Utamaro, who were known for creating unique artwork using only black ink on white paper or rice paper (a type of handmade paper).

Japonisme

Japonisme came about because of the craze for art from the Orient in Europe during the late 1800s. The word was used by a French writer named Charles Baudelaire for the first time, who wrote that Westerners were fascinated with Japanese culture at that time.

Artists later adopted the word like Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin. They incorporated Japanese design elements into their work and were inspired by traditional European folk art (known as Orientalism).

Vincent van Gogh became obsessed with Japanese art from an early age. He was a great fan of Hokusai, Utamaro, and Hiroshige, from which he collected prints and paintings. Van Gogh tried to imitate their style when painting and drawing but did not achieve the same perfection as these artists had done in their work.

He Was A Great Fan Of Hokusai, Utamaro, and Hiroshige

Van Gogh was a great fan of Hokusai, Utamaro, and Hiroshige. He collected their prints and used them as inspiration for many paintings. Van Gogh admired their work because he could see the beauty in the simplicity of their paintings.

Vincent Van Gogh – Blossoming Almond Tree

You can see the influence of these artists in many of his works. For example, Van Gogh was very interested in Japanese woodblock prints, particularly those of Hokusai and Utamaro, as well as several other Japanese artists, including Hiroshige.

The Japanese style of painting was trendy at the time, and many people thought Vincent van Gogh artwork resulted from his time in Japan. This led to some confusion about whether or not he was Japanese. 

It is noteworthy that, although many people believed this about van Gogh’s work and personality, it does not necessarily mean he was racist or xenophobic against other cultures.

His Work Seemed To Lack Emotion and Expression

Some critics complain that Van Gogh’s influence on Japanese art resulted in insipid artwork devoid of emotion and expression. This is not to say that his work was flat or lacking in feeling; it has a distinctive style. However, this style is considered too flat for some viewers who prefer more vibrant colors and less subdued ones.

While post-impressionism was a short-lived movement that began with Monet’s work (and ended with Gaugin’s). However, van Gogh did not originate this idea but took it from Japanese artists whom he admired greatly: Hokusai Katsushika, Utamaro Shunsho et al..

There Was a High Interest In Japanese Art and Literature In That Period

Many other people point out that Japan has always held a fascination for Western artists and writers, especially during this period. Japan was a mysterious country to Europeans; its art was considered exotic, and it was often seen as a way to escape monotony by expressing emotion and beauty. It also allowed people who wanted to express themselves without being censored or judged harshly by society.

If you are interested in Japanese art, it’s well worth reading up on van Gogh’s interpretations. He was fascinated by Japanese culture and its traditions, which led to him creating paintings of kimonos and Sumo wrestlers.

He also had a particular style to his paintings: one that was unique for its time, something that other artists would later imitate after him.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Van Gogh’s fascination with Japanese woodblock prints and other aspects of Japanese culture made him the most renowned painter in Europe. He was not just interested in their beauty but also their inscrutability – which is why many people consider his paintings as a whole to reflect an obsession with Japan.

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